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We Are Generation G

April is Genocide Awareness and Prevention month. Genocide, ethnic violence, political tribalism: poison by any other name remains just as fatal.

On this day in 1994, the plane boarding Burundian President Cyprien Ntaryamira and two of his ministers was deliberately shot, killing those on board, and sparking a nationwide genocide. To Rwandans and Burundians, April 6th is a bloody and indelible day in our collective memories; it was the beginning of the end for our people, which ostensibly led us to a path of no return.

April 6th also hits incredibly close to home for me and countless others. Genocide is the reason for my being in the cold of Canada today; it is the reason I have never met my extended family before my first 19 years of life; and being one of two ministers present on the plane that unforgettable day, it is the reason my father is no longer living.

Questions from the families of the victims regarding the matter has yet to be investigated by the Burundian and Rwandan governments; to this day, there has been zero accountability or reparations made on behalf of these states.

However, I am less inclined to discuss who is to blame for the past, being that I am first concerned with who will be held accountable for the future of our nations; there is blood on my hands, albeit I have never held a machete in my life. Nonetheless, it is unmistakably our duty to secure the future of our nations and its civil population. Those with the ability and the courage to speak without fearing persecution have the responsibility to address the issue at hand. Those with diplomatic skills and accessibility of information are not unarmed nor frail. And if you dare not to acknowledge the elusiveness of a prosperous future for these war stricken nations, you have nothing to fear but fear itself.

We are Generation G – the generation of people directly or indirectly affected by genocides. Burundians and Rwandans must recognize all genocidal victims – Hutus and Tutsis alike – and express our demands for stabilized nations and the transparency of polities. Especially with recent talks of renewed ethnic violence in Burundi resulting from President Nkurunziza’s unconstitutional and widely contested reelection, a united ethnic front is as important now as it should have been over two decades ago. For this reason, we must agree to be the last of Generation G and work towards the abolition of incessant and politically (i.e. not ethnically) induced violence.

But in spite of its presence within the continent, Africans are not the sole claimants of Genocide Awareness and Prevention month, since genocide is one of many evils that will not discriminate. Europeans, such as the Christians of Armenia and the Jews of Germany, know this all too well. It is therefore a global issue, as opposed to just another African problem. This month is dedicated to the memories of the fallen casualties of genocides, irrespective of racial or cultural identities. This month is a dedication to peace, unity, and the heterogeneity of nations.

If there is one thing to remember in dedication of Genocide Awareness and Prevention month, it is that,

We face neither East nor West: we face forward.

– Kwame Nkrumah

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by | April 5, 2016 · 10:09 AM